The Black Hat Dance, also known as the Shana Cham in Tibet, where it was originated from. This dance is performed in the Himalayan Buddhist countries to commemorate the killing of the anti-Buddhist Tibetan King Langdarma in 842 by a Buddhist monk, Pelkyi Dorji. The dance also transformed the dancers into powerful tantric yogis, who take possession of the dancing areas and drive out evil spirits as they stamp the ground -- Central Bhutan.

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Prayer wheels are carved with the Sanskrit word "Om Mani Padme Hum". Reciting these words while turning those wheels are for one to accumulate merits and purifies obstacles - Swayambhunath Temple in Nepal.

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Pooja is a way of worshiping the Hindu deities. It involves prayers, offerings, blessings and sacrifices. The ritual is performed by a Hindu priest followed by distribution of arthi, lighted camphor in white substance, applied to the forehead of the devotees, receiving it as dharshan, a blessing - Sri Mariamman Temple, Singapore.

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A man prostrating in front of the Buddha Donderma Statue in Thimphu, Bhutan. Prostration in Buddhism is a form of veneration, purification and an act to accumulate merit for better karma. 

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Balinese woman offering pooja in the morning. Hinduism is practiced by the majority in Bali, Indonesia. 

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The Atsara, who is usually a monk in disguise as a clown at all Bhutanese religious festivals, would go around with a phallus to bless the spectators with a little humour. It is believe that the phallus wards off evils and brings good luck. The Atsara can be quite abrupt with their act simply to make everyone feel embarrassed. Embarrassment is also a blessing which helps to cleanse any unwanted or evil thoughts that comes into mind.

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A Dayak welcoming ritual is being performed when there are new guests to the longhouse. This is part of the ritual to inform the spirit of the longhouse of visitors and to bless the guest's onward journey. The Dayak people are the native of Borneo.

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A dying person of Hindu religion will make their journey to Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu to wait for their last breath. Their remains will be wrapped in white cloth and their feet will have to touch the waters of the Bagmati river for cleansing before the cremation. Their ashes will be scattered into the river which is their final journey to flow with the waters on Bagmati river to meet the holy river Ganges for eternity.

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